Archive for the ‘Cemeteries’ Category

Amanuensis Monday – Charlena Fay Isgrigg Obituary

Obituary – Charlena Faye Isgrigg
Book “Obituaries – Argonia Kansas and Vicinity”
Volume IV
Freda Deen Earles

Charlena Faye Isgrigg, daughter of Frank and Susan Kline Holt was born October 19, 1915 in Bluejacket, Oklahoma.

She moved to Milan, Kansas with her parents at the age of 10 and lived in the Milan and Argonia communities until the time of her passing

On October 29, 1937 she married Earl Isgrigg and to that union was born one daughter, Connie Hodson.

She was preceded in death by both her mother and father, one brother, Olin Holt and one sister, Bessie Edwards.

She leaves to mourn her passing, her husband, Earl; her daughter, Connie Hodson and grandson, Brad Hodson of West Allis, Wisconsin; two sisters, Mrs. Mildred Carrico, Commerce, Oklahoma, and Mrs. Lola Blackett, Wichita, and one brother, Virgil Holt, Milan.

( Sherry’s Note:  The obituary did not state the date of death, but according to www.findagrave.com, Find A Grave Memorial# 38953421 Charlena passed away on 26 Jul 1971.)

Carnival of Genealogy – Carrie Breneman Jones

I love this photograph of my Grandma and Grandpa Jones.  Although this was taken before I was born (as my grandfather was in it) this is how I remember my grandmother looking.  Round-faced and smiling, and just a bit plump. Comfortable to snuggle up against. (Grandma’s are supposed to be plump, right?  I hope so, because I’m working on being a good Gramma.)

I wish that my grandfather had lived long enough for me to meet (and remember him), but this Carnival of Genealogy post is about my Grandma Carrie Breneman Jones, who died when I was eight years old.

Warner & Carrie Breneman Jones

Warner LaRue and Carrie Esther (Breneman) Jones

 

When I was just a little bitty girl, my mama told me that her mama was really unhappy that they had named me “Sherry”.  She said that Sherry is also the name of an alcoholic beverage, and her mama just wasn’t happy with her for giving me that name.

So I guess it’s no wonder when I went to grade school and I really didn’t know what my Grandma’s last name was, that when the teacher began talking about Kansas’ Carrie Nation going into bars with an axe to fight for temperance I kind of wondered for a short time if that was my Grandma Carrie that did that.  I don’t know why I didn’t run home and ask my mom about it, but I didn’t, but I did figure out, after awhile, that my Grandma Carrie wasn’t the infamous axe wielding Carrie in my history book.  (The above doesn’t look like the picture of an axe-wielding Grandma, does it?)

My Grandma Carrie was a very crafty lady.  Her hands were always busy making something.  She loved to crochet, from the very tiny delicate flower shaped earrings to the beautiful heirloom bedspread that she made for my mother, and that my mother later gave to me.

She crocheted doll clothes for my dolls and when my new favorite plastic horse needed a rider and there were none to be bought in the correct size, she created one.  My Grandma Carrie created an Indian, excuse me, a Native American brave complete with tiny leather fringed breeches and shirt, and bendable legs so he could sit a horse.  I still have him, tucked away (somewhere) and when I find him, I’ll try to add the picture here.

And as I write this, I just realized that she may have fashioned the brave after the Native Americans that came to their cabin in Nebraska asking for food when she was just a very small girl, and they lived on the Nebraska prairie where my Grandma herded cattle on horseback by herself on the prairie during the day.

When she was older, Grandma Carrie taught herself to paint and she loved the National Geographic magazine for its beautiful photographs that often inspired her painting.  She also painted a picture of my brother’s 4-H Dairy Cow “Jenny,” too, for him, and “Jenny” hung on our kitchen wall while I was growing up.

I wish my Grandma had lived long enough for me to get to know her as an adult, because I think I inherited many of my interests and talents from her.  Like my Grandma, I’m crafty, though I’ve not had much time to do it lately, and if I can see something, particularly a fabric something, I can often make a pattern for it or create it from one I find.  Also like my Grandma and my mom, I painted for several years till I learned I was sensitive to the oil and turpentine smells, and like my Grandma and my mother I love a good book!

And, I wish she had lived long enough to ask her all those many genealogy questions that I now wish I had the answers to!

 

Other Links:

 Wordless Wednesday: Stocking & Jones Family
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/10/wordless-wednesday-stocking-jones-family/

Wordless Wednesday: Constantine Breneman & Carrie Breneman Jones & family
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/wordless-wednesday-constantine-breneman-carrie-breneman-jones-families/

 

Tombstone Tuesday – (Jesse) Willis Laird

This past four days have been “Happy Dance” Days!  Thanks to a flu bug, I sat with my laptop and searched the ‘net for family history.

I hit a jackpot with the Southern Kentucky genealogy website at: http://www.so-ky.com/ when I found my Gr-Gr-Grandmother Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb’s brother Willis’s death certificate and a photograph of his tombstone.

I started to post his tombstone photograph here, but didn’t feel quite right about doing so, as I didn’t take the photograph, and so here is the link to the tombstone, and below is the transcription.

Jesse W. Laird tombstone photograph
http://www.so-ky.com/cem/hartcem/n/newhope/IMG_9290.jpg

Transcription:

Jesse W. Laird
Co D 2 KY Cavalry
May 7, 1835
February 15, 1916

More Laird links:

Jesse Willis Laird Death Certificate
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2012/03/amanuensis-monday-willis-laird-death-certificate/

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Including Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/saturday-night-genealogy-fun/

Willis’ Aunt – Bettie Crabb’s Tombstone in Glasgow Cemetery, Glasgow, Kentucky Cemetery
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/tombstone-tuesday-bettie-crabb-barren-county-kentucky/

Willis’ brother-in-law – J. R. U. Crabb, Glasgow Cemetery, Glasgow, Kentucky
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2009/11/tombstone-tuesday-j-r-u-crabb-barren-county-kentucky/

Willis’ sister, Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb, buried in the Milan Cemetery, Milan, Sumner County, Kansas
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2009/09/tombstone-tuesday-elizabeth-laird-crabb/

 

 

Amanuensis Monday – Willis Laird Death Certificate

I had a flu bug this weekend, and it is that flu bug that I have to thank for having a “Happy Dance” weekend!

A little virus had me sitting more than usual, and to combat boredom, I started ‘hunting’ on the Internet for ancestors and their siblings!  Thanks to the virus, I don’t remember exactly how I arrived at this wonderful Kentucky website, but I’m not sure I had ever been to this one before, and if I had, it has a lot of new ‘stuff’ on it, including my Gr-gr-grandmother’s brother, Willis Laird’s death certificate!

As a volunteer here in my own county, I am doubly appreciate of those who find and share family history information, and I want to say “Many thanks to the volunteers of this Southern Kentucky website at http://www.so-ky.com!  I am so very grateful to find out for certain now, that Willis is my Gr-Gr-Grandmother Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb’s brother”

You can see a scanned image of Willis Laird’s death certificate here: http://www.so-ky.com/dth/14/Jesse%20W.%20Laird.jpg

According to the website, Willis’ first name is actually Jesse, and though his death certificate doesn’t state that, his tombstone does.  Comparing the dates on tombstone and death certificate help verify that they are one and the same.

Information on the death Certificate:

Commonwealth of Kentucky
State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics

Place of death:
County: Hart KY
Vet.Fot. Northtown

Registration District No. 6174
File No: 4772
Registered No. 51

3. Sex  Male
4. Color or Race: White
5. S/M/W/D:  Married
6. Date of Birth: May 7 1835
7. Age: 80 yrs  8 mos  8 da
8. Occupation:  Farmer
9. Birthplace: KY
10.  Name of Father: Hesikiah Laird
11.   Birthplace of father: Unknown
12.   Maiden name of Mother: Patsy Carter
13.   Birthplace of Mother:  Unknown
14.   Informant:  V. J. Eggsdon/Iggsdon (?) Address:  Cave City
15. Filed:  Feb 17, 1916 Informant:   J. M. Isenberg
16. Date of Death:  2-15-1916
17: I here certify, that I attended deceased from February 4th, 1916 to February 14th, 1916, that I last saw him alive on February 14th, 1916, and that death occurred on the date stated above at 8:00 a.m. (I think, hard for me to read).  the
Cause of Death was as follows:

Lagrippe – Duration 15 daays
Contributery: Pneumonia
Secondary: (illegible, at least to me)

Duration  5 Days

Signed: J. T. Godby, M. D.
2-16-1916 Address:  Cave City, KY

18. Length of residence – not filled out
19. Place of Burial:  New Hope Date of Burial: February 17, 1916
20. Undertaker: J. W. Oster Address:  Cave City, KY

What a lot of information is contained in this death certificate!  I know that Willis was living in the Cave City area, and that he died 4 years after his sister Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb did.

I know what cemetery Willis is buried in, and luckily enough (and thanks to the Southern Kentucky volunteers) also have a photograph of the tombstone as well as photographs of the cemetery and church there, and will be sharing links to that soon!

Thank you Kentucky volunteers!  I’m still doing a Happy Dance!

 

More Laird info:

http://www.familytreewriter.com/category/sherrys-family-tree/lard-laird-genealogy/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tombstone Tuesday – Myrtle O. Lamb

Sherry Stocking Kline
31 August 2010

Myrtle Lamb - Osborne Cemetery, Sumner County, Kansas

055 - Myrtle Lamb Tombstone

Tombstone Reads:

Myrtle O. Lamb
Mar 13, 1881
May 27, 1939

I don’t know Myrtle O. Lamb, but she is buried near several of my family members, and a quick search on Ancestry tells me that on the 1925 Census, she and her husband, L. H. Lamb, lived at home with their children, Henry, Wilford, Earl, Clarence, Arthur, Eva, Nina, Bulah, Margret, and Mary.

Nina was my sister-in-law Nancy’s mother, and so Myrtle is the great-grandmother of my nieces and nephews.  So, she is almost ‘kin’ after all.

Amanuensis Monday – the John Lindsay/Lindsey Family

Sherry Stocking Kline
August 30, 2010

Lindsay, (Lindsey) John

Born – June 11, 1800 in Enniskillan, Ireland.
Died – October 14, 1885 in Sumner County, Kansas, buried Anson Cemetery (Tombstone Record and his direct communication to George Clarence Lindsay).  See 1880 Census Record.

Marriages

John Lindsay Married – 1st – Mary Rutledge – July 9, 1833 in Carroll County, Ohio. She was a daughter of Jane Crozier and William Rutledge and was born in Fermanaugh, Ireland about 1813.  Came to America with mother and siblings 1827. Died March 1856, six weeks after the birth of her last child. (Marriage Records Bk 1, p. 1, Carroll County, Ohio)

John Lindsay Married – 2nd – Harriet Barnes – about 1867 in Iowa.  She was born in New York in 1826. (Census Record 1870 Iowa Monroe County, Wautua Twnshp)

How the Lindsay Family came to Live in America…

John Lindsay quarreled with his father about religion and came to Canada in 1818, then to Carroll County, Ohio where he owned 76 acres of land more or less.  This was conveyed by patent deed bearing date at Washington City, D. C., November 18, 1833.

John and Mary sold 6 acres in 1837.  March 15, 1856 he sold the remaining land for $800. (Carroll County, Ohio Deed Bk Volume 15, p. 299)

Moved to Iowa where he is listed in the 1860 Monroe County, Union Township p. 342 with 3 sons and daughter Mary.

The other children remained in Ohio. Listed again in Mantua Township, Monroe County, Iowa, p. 367, year 1870, with wife and children and son Edward 24 by first marriage. Real estate $2800.

Came to Sumner County, Kansas in 70′s (as handwritten on the paper) 80′s and died there. He was a farmer, a reader, interested in books.  6 ft tall, light, looked like Thoreau. Read the Saturday Evening Post to his children by the light of pine knots.  Took great pains and trouble with teaching of youngest daughter, Callie.

A sister, perhaps named Margaret, came later to America, went south to nurse in a yellow fever epidemic and was never heard of again.

Naturalized in Ohio – spelling changed to Lindsey (with an e) by mistake at that time.

Children of John Lindsay

1.    James – b. 1834. Killed at Vicksburg

2.    Ann – b. 1835 or 36 married Ferdinand Wood (born July 11, 1841 d. January 20, 192? (the photocopy cut off last digit))

3.    William Rutledge b. December 28, 1837, married Julia Ann Miller, daughter of Henry Miller and Isabelle Warner, died May 27, 1907, daughter of (?) Ebenezer and Mary Smith. (some of the dates, and people in this part of the account it was difficult to decipher which belonged to who. Please see original on Pioneer Settler File Page 5.)

4.    Sarah – born 1839, married Henry Bracken (left-handed) October 18, 1860

5.    George – born 1842 – Company A 36 Regiment, Iowa Infantry, born Carroll County, Ohio. Enlisted February 1, 1863 at Ottumwa, Iowa. Taken prisoner at Marks Mill, Arkansas, died August 20, 1864 of disease at Camp Ford, TE (again, last letters cut off on photocopy.)

6.    Edward – born 1845 – married in Iowa, went to Woodford County, Illinois, Spring Bay Post Office after 1870.

7.    Mary Elizabeth – born May 7, 1846, Died: July 22, 1929. Married William H. Meuser, Born December 13, 1841, died November 17, 1911, son of George and Katherine Meuser.

8.    John – died in infancy.

9.    Margaret – died in infancy

10.    Eliza A. – born October 19th (or 17th, difficult to decipher), 1853, died May 1929. Married September 3, 1873, John Henry Brooks, born January 12, 1854, died November 4, 1913, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Crozier Brooks.

11.    Martha Malissa, born February 8, 1856, Married 1879, Robert McCort (1850 – 1909) Died September 21, 1909.  He was son of Henry and Margarite Johnson McCort.

12.    Calista – born 1868, married Don Camp. Died February 7, 1943, Long Lane, Wisconsin.

13.    James – died infancy. Born May 1870.

Transcriber’s Notes: The John Lindsay Family Information was transcribed on August 30, 2010 (by Sherry Kline)  from a hand written paper found in the Pioneer Settler/Family Files (originals numbered 4 and 5) at the Sumner County Historical & Genealogical Center in Wellington, Kansas.

I have transcribed this paper as best as possible, though in a couple of  places it is a little unclear which death dates belong to whom, and in a couple of places the photocopy cuts off the edge of the words.

According to notes in this file, Mary Rutledge Lindsay died in 1856, six weeks after birth of last child, which would be Martha Malissa. So, Calista and James would (most likely) be John and Harriet’s children.

This file is part of the Pioneer Settler files that I have been working on transcribing. But John Lindsay’s daughter is also part of  my husband’s cousin’s family.  So, they are almost related!  There is quite a lot of family information and several family group sheets in this family file folder, and I will add more info here,  or create a new post with a little more info about the extended family as time permits.

When I am done transcribing and indexing this large file, it will go back ‘home’ to the Sumner County History and Genealogy Center in Wellington, Box 402, Wellington, KS 67152 for researchers to use.

For those I index and transcribe who are not family (or as in this case, almost family) you can read the transcriptions at the SCHGS blog at http://www.ks-schgs.blogspot.com.

Tombstone Tuesday – Donovan L. Walters, Sr.

by Sherry Stocking Kline
19 May 2010

Some time back I posted a Tombstone Tuesday photograph of Cora Pauline Walter’s tombstone.

Always curious, I did a little preliminary research at the Sumner County History and Genealogy Center, and when I didn’t find something easily, stopped, because she isn’t family.

But recently I was at the Osborne Cemetery, near Mayfield, Kansas in Sumner County, and another Walter’s tombstone caught my eye and my imagination.  I wonder if they are related?  Married?  Siblings?

Donovan L Walters - Osborne Cemetery

On the Stone:

Donovan L. Walters, Sr.
Oklahoma
S Sgt Army Air Forces
World War II
March 16, 1910   (cross)    Sept 24, 1972

This tombstone is located just a few feet from Cora Pauline’s stone.  There is just one stone in between the two, which leads me to believe that research will show that there is some relationship between the two.

Tombstone Tuesday – Myrtle B Jones

by Sherry Stocking Kline
4 May 2010

This eight and 1/2 month old child’s stone, located in the Osborne Cemetery, Sumner County, Kansas, about 10 miles west of Wellington, Kansas, and about 1/2 mile East of Mayfield on West 20th Street  is another mystery that I would very much like to solve.

Myrtle B. Jones - Osborne Cemetery

Kinfolk?  Or Just a Lot of Coincidences?

On the Stone:

Myrtle B. Jones
Dau of W.  & M. E. Jones
Died July 5, 1890
Aged 8 Mos 18 Days
(I was not able to read the inscription below the name and date, and as I had my granddaughters with me, and no safe way to clean the stone with me, I didn’t try to clean and read it while there and am not able to in the photograph.)

Is Myrtle part of my family?   I think so, actually.  Myrtle’s parents are W. and M. E. Jones, and just two stones over is a stone for Evan Jones, and Evan’s parents were Willis and Martha Ellen (Smith) Jones, originally from the Hart & Barren County, Kentucky area.

So Who was Ten-Year-Old George T. Hill?

In between Myrtle and Evan is a ten-year-old boy named George T. Hill (photo coming soon) and while so far the Hill name is not one that has shown up in our family tree, my mother feels that he is related, but she does not know how, and both Myrtle and George died thirty-some years before my mother was born.  My family lived next door to a Hill family for (at least) two generations in both families, but the Hill child next to Myrtle does not appear (according to census, etc) to belong to any of those Hills.

Is Myrtle my great-great aunt?  I think so.  In this small cemetery, buried so closely together, and within a few stones of my father that would be a lot of coincidences for there not to be a kinship.  But before I add Myrtle to our family tree as a lost child of Willis and Martha, I’m going to be looking in area newspapers for obituaries and making sure there weren’t any other W. & M. E. Jones in this area.  And then I may just use a pencil when I add her in…

Tombstone Tuesday – Guy L. Wood

by Sherry Stocking Kline
27 April 2010

Here is a tombstone for a family member on my husband’s side, and I’ve been having a great deal of  fun lately trying to put the puzzle pieces together, and honestly, trying very hard to just shove some of those pieces in place and make them fit!  I knew they had to, I just didn’t know how.

Guy Wood Tombstone - Milan Cemetery, Milan, Sumner County, Kansas

Guy Wood Tombstone - Milan Cemetery, Milan, Sumner County, Kansas

On the Stone:

Guy L. Wood
Apr 16, 1891
Oct 11, 1947

Located in the Milan Cemetery,  just about 15 miles west of Wellington, Kansas (and a couple of miles west of Milan) on Highway 160.

But the pieces just wouldn’t fit, no matter how hard I tried.  And then one day, someone said “a Wood married a Wood” and it all fell into place.

Now what are the odds that a Wood family would live a mile away from another Wood family, that they would NOT be related (for at least two generations back), they would originate from totally different Eastern states, and that they had several children with the same name?

Thanks to helpful family hints from a cousin, research I’ve done, and the records that I’ve found at the Sumner County History & Genealogy Center in Wellington, I’ve added some good branches to this tree, and firmed up some of the other connections.  More to come!

Tombstone Tuesday – Julian Jones – Barren County, Kentucky

by Sherry Stocking Kline
13 April 2010

I snapped this Tombstone for a couple of reasons. One, I hoped he was family, and Two, it just caught my eye.  It stood there, and though it said  “Gone, but not forgotten,” it seemed, well, lonely.

And like some tombstones that you see, it just made me wonder, who was he?  Why is he buried there all by himself?  What did he  do for a living? What did he die of?

All those questions ran through my mind, but I guess first and foremost, was the question, is he part of my family?

Julian Jones, Caney Fork Baptist Cemetery

Julian Jones - Caney Fork Baptist Cemetery

On the Stone:

Julian Jones
1863 – 1932
Gone But Not Forgotten

Today I don’t have those answers, and even though he is buried near my Smith family stones, I don’t have the answer to the  “is he family” question.

But it’s a puzzle that I plan to solve!

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