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Amanuensis Monday – Richard S. and Mary (Corson) Corson and their Children

Three hundred years with the Corson families in America

 

Richard S. Corson, born Jan. 9, 1815, was the eldest son of Elias and his second wife, Abigail (Steelman) Corson. He married Mary Corson, born May 25, 1821, the daughter of John M. and Eliza (Ingersoll) Corson, on Oct. 15, 1836. They were married at the home of her parents by Rev. Mathias Jerman.

Richard S. and his family lived in Petersburg, Cape May County, N. J., for ten years, the husband and father farming part of the time and going to sea the rest of the time.

In the spring of 1845 he went to Illinois and worked on a farm north of Pleasant Plains, Illinois, to see how he liked the country.  The Illinois prairies appealed to him so well that he rented a farm and sowed fall wheat, then bought a horse and went back to New Jersey on horseback.

In the spring he returned to Illinois with his wife and five children.  The trip from New Jersey was made by water except from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh.  From thence by the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to St. Louis, then up to Illinois River to Beardstown, and from there to Pleasant Plains.

They lived for five years near Richland, Sangamon County, Illinois, then in the fall of 1850 he bought some land about five miles southeast of Pleasant Plains, Illinois, and built a home on it.  The family moved into the new home on February 26, 1851, and here the parents lived the remainder of their lives.  They lived to celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary on October 16, 1901. (From information from Fannie E. Corson of New Berlin, Illinois, and Nellie R. (Corson) Soderburg of Dwight, Kansas.)

Richard S. and Mary Corson had thirteen children, two of whom died young, one was killed in the Civil War, nine married, eight of these leaving descendants.  At this time the descendants of this remarkable family are scattered over the western part of the United States from Illinois to the Pacific Coast.  The following are the children:

122461    Asail Corson, born Feb 26, 1838

122462    Abigail Corson, born Oct 24, 1839

122463    Sarah Elizabeth Corson, born Aug 7, 1841

122464    Townsend Corson, born Aug 17, 1843

122465    Richard Corson, born Mar 9, 1845

122466    Mary Ann Corson, born Feb 9, 1847

122467    Margaret Corson, born Jan 19, 1849

122468    John Foster Corson, born May 1, 1851

122469    Elias Corson, born Apr. 27, 1855, died Sept 5, 1856

12246:10  Emily Frances (Fannie E.) Corson, born May 20, 1857

12246:11  Elias Corson, born July 30, 1859, died Mar 24, 1862

12246:12  Winfield Scott Corson, born Jan 3, 1862

12246:13  Ida May Corson, born Oct 25, 1866

Richard S. Corson died Dec 7, 1901, and Mary Corson died Aug 23, 1909.  They are buried in Bethel Cemetery, Pleasant Plains, Illinois.

Description

BookPageNO: Vol II. XII. The sixth generation. The descendants of John and Mary Corson

Source Information

Ancestry.com. Three hundred years with the Corson families in America : including the Staten Island-Pennsylvania Corsons, the Sussex County,[database on-line]. Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.
Original data: Corson, Orville,. Three hundred years with the Corson families in America : including the Staten Island-Pennsylvania Corsons, the Sussex County, New Jersey Corsons, the Cape May or South Jersey Corsons, the Corsons of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, the Corsons of Amwell Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, the New England Corson families, the Canadian Corson family. Burlington, Vt.: Printed by Free Press Interstate Print. Corp., 1939.

Related Links:

Margaret “Maggie” (Corson) McGinnis Dies at Age 101

Margaret “Maggie” (Corson) McGinnis Sang for Abraham Lincoln

Gr-Grandmother Maggie (Corson) McGinnis & Maud McGinnis Stocking Scrapbook page

Thomas J. McGinnis Obituary

The Corson Family Association

Book: “Three Hundred Years with the Corson Family” by Orville Corson

 

Amanuensis Monday – John Hurlburt Stocking’s Death

Norwalk Daily Register
Norwalk, Ohio
20 Oct 1894
Pg 4 Col 6

After visiting friends and relatives a couple of weeks in Clarksfield and New London, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stocking left on last Wednesday for their home in El Dorado, Kansas, via St. Charles, Illinois, where they halted to spend a few days with relatives, whence they would start direct for their home; but on Sunday evening, on retiring for the night, Mr. Stocking fell down a flight of stairs, rupturing a blood vessel, the blood flowing from his nose and ears; no bones broken, he never spoke, but lived one hour, when his spirit took its flight across the dark river to that “undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns.”  Mr. Stocking was one of nature’s nobility, a true and good man.  To Mrs. Stocking and their son, in their bereavement, we extend our sympathies.

John Hurlburt Stocking’s son, Roderick Remine Stocking, was my great-grandfather, and you can find a photograph of him here, as well as more information about him.

Roderick’s mother, Betsey Jane Ames, died in Oct 1856 shortly after Roderick’s little brother Bishop was born.  After Betsey’s death, John Hurlburt married Caroline Gates in April 1860.

In 1894, my great-grandfather, Roderick was living on the farm that he homesteaded in Sumner County, Kansas with his wife, Frances “Fannie” Hitchcock.

More Links:

Roderick Remine Stocking Photograph 
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2011/05/wordless-wednesday-roderick-remine-stocking-photo/

The J. H. Stocking Bible
Carnival of Genealogy – the J. H. Stocking Bible

 

Tombstone Tuesday – (Jesse) Willis Laird

This past four days have been “Happy Dance” Days!  Thanks to a flu bug, I sat with my laptop and searched the ‘net for family history.

I hit a jackpot with the Southern Kentucky genealogy website at: http://www.so-ky.com/ when I found my Gr-Gr-Grandmother Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb’s brother Willis’s death certificate and a photograph of his tombstone.

I started to post his tombstone photograph here, but didn’t feel quite right about doing so, as I didn’t take the photograph, and so here is the link to the tombstone, and below is the transcription.

Jesse W. Laird tombstone photograph
http://www.so-ky.com/cem/hartcem/n/newhope/IMG_9290.jpg

Transcription:

Jesse W. Laird
Co D 2 KY Cavalry
May 7, 1835
February 15, 1916

More Laird links:

Jesse Willis Laird Death Certificate
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2012/03/amanuensis-monday-willis-laird-death-certificate/

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Including Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/saturday-night-genealogy-fun/

Willis’ Aunt – Bettie Crabb’s Tombstone in Glasgow Cemetery, Glasgow, Kentucky Cemetery
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/tombstone-tuesday-bettie-crabb-barren-county-kentucky/

Willis’ brother-in-law – J. R. U. Crabb, Glasgow Cemetery, Glasgow, Kentucky
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2009/11/tombstone-tuesday-j-r-u-crabb-barren-county-kentucky/

Willis’ sister, Elizabeth Laird Jones Crabb, buried in the Milan Cemetery, Milan, Sumner County, Kansas
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2009/09/tombstone-tuesday-elizabeth-laird-crabb/

 

 

Happy Valentine’s Day!

by Sherry Stocking Kline
February 14, 2012

Happy Valentine’s Day!  We scrambled around to get cards sent out to the granddaughters and now we’re busy sending out e-cards to other friends & family!

Check out the Civil War era Valentines at the Kansas State Historical website, and the very interesting stories that go along with them here!  Have a Great Day!

Wordless Wednesday – Myrtle Nyberg & Roderick Porter Stocking Wedding Photograph

by Sherry Stocking Kline
October 12, 2011

I have been blessed this year with so many who have shared family photographs with me, and this past spring, my cousin Larry brought me a huge box of photographs to scan!  I have yet to measure the box, but it is approxinately 1.5 feet by 3.5 feet, and chock full of family photos!

Needless to say, I spent hours scanning and am still trying to make time to organize the results!

The following photograph is my Great-Aunt Myrtle Nyberg Stocking and her husband, Roderick Porter, who was called Porter by his family and friends.  Porter and Myrtle were my cousin Larry’s grandparents.

Roderick Porter & Myrtle (Nyberg) Stocking

Roderick Porter & Myrtle (Nyberg) Stocking

Porter and Myrtle were married on December 30, 1908, and Porter was killed on July 5th, 1924 when he was working on electrical lines.

Music Monday – Mary Did You Know – Sign Language

By Sherry Stocking Kline
December 6th, 2010

After watching several Christmas Video’s, my Christmas spirit has me humming all my seasonal favorites, and I’m looking forward to teaching my granddaughters the signing that goes along with each song! (Just as soon as I learn it myself!)

I hope you enjoy, and have a wonderful Christmas!

Technorati Post

Getting accepted by Technorati includes posting a blog post that includes this UUPF9WXDK8KR bit of info!

Woo hoo!

Advent Calendar – December 3 – Christmas Ornaments

Sherry Stocking Kline
December 3, 2009

Thomas MacEntee’s Advent Calendar Challenge can be found at GeneaBloggers here.

Christmas Tree Ornaments

Did your family have heirloom or cherished ornaments? Did you ever string popcorn and cranberries? Did your family or ancestors make Christmas ornaments?

There are two ornaments that I remember from childhood as being special, the angel for the top of the tree and the ‘bubble’ lights.

She Bravely Clung to the Top of the Tree…

Our angel was small and short and bless her heart, she bravely clung to the top of the tree year after year, even though her wings became a little tattered, and her robes a little worn.

She often leaned to one side or the other, depending on which way the Christmas tree leaned, but the tree wasn’t done until she was placed on the very top and even though we could have bought a new angel, it wouldn’t have been the same.  It wouldn’t have been our angel.

The beautiful bubble lights came into to our family before I did, (or before I remember anyhow) and they were the first thing to go on the tree each year.

They looked like miniature candles, and the candle part was glass with a colored liquid inside which bubbled up to the top when the light became warm. One by one, the bubble lights quit bubbling, and we replaced them with the newer tiny little twinkling lights, but it wasn’t the same.

I remember stringing both cranberries and popcorn, but as Carol said in “Reflections from the Fence” the cranberries were hard as rocks, and hard to penetrate with a needle” so I believe that was a one-time thing, and there were always the paper chains to bring home from school and add to the tree each year.

Dad Didn’t Care What he Received for Christmas…

We gathered on Christmas Eve to exchange presents, and though my father never dressed up, Dad loved playing Santa.  My dad really didn’t care what he received for Christmas, his joy came from watching his family open the gifts he and mom had bought.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – The Day the Genealogy Serendipity Angels Smiled!

The following is from Randy Seaver’s Genea-Musings website!  Thank you, Randy!

Yes, it’s Saturday Night, and time for some Genealogy Fun!

My friend, Leland Meitzler, posted his Top Ten list of “Most Satisfying Genealogy Events” yesterday – and it’s a good list – please read it and respond to it if you want to.

For today’s SNGF, if you choose to participate (cue the Mission Impossible music!), please:

1) Tell us about one (or more) “Satisfying Genealogy Moments” from your family history and genealogy research. What was it, and how did it make you feel? You can make a Top Ten list if you want to!

2) Write your own blog post, or make a comment on this post, or make a comment on Facebook, and tell us about your “moment in time.”

The Day the Genealogy Serendipity Angels Smiled!
by Sherry Stocking Kline, October 10, 2009

My Number One favorite all-time Genealogy Experience was one of those “ahhh moments” when Serendipity and the Angels smiled on us.

It was July of 2005, and my husband and I were leaving soon to visit our son in Illinois, and we were taking my mom who was 93 at the time, to Barren County, Kentucky for a day or two and try to locate my Mom’s dad’s childhood home.

I did some research before I left. I re-checked on library hours, wrote down addresses, packed up a notebook (and laptop), and called the South Central Kentucky Cultural Center in Glasgow, Kentucky to talk to the wonderfully helpful woman I had spoken with on a previous occasion.

I nearly hung up the phone…

I nearly hung up the phone when I learned that the woman who had been so warm and friendly before was not working.

That would have been a mistake.

I sighed to myself,  decided to take a chance, re-state my facts and share my story with the woman who had answered the phone.

“I’m looking for information,” I said, “about my great-grandfather and great-grandmother, Willis Washington Jones and his wife, Martha Ellen Smith and her parents, Charles and Virginia Hawley Smith.”

There Was Dead Silence…

There was dead silence for at least three heartbeats.

And then she said (and here I still get goosebumps) “Charles and Virginia Hawley Smith are my great-great grandparents, too.”

“Oh. My. Gosh.” I thought.

“Hello, cousin!” was my astonished reply. The genealogical angels had not deserted me; they had given me a wonderful gift!

My brand-new cousin’s name was Nancy Bertram Bush, she was ‘into’ genealogy, and she invited us to give her a call when we got to Glasgow.

A couple of weeks later, we were in Glasgow. I stopped at the courthouse, looked up some land records, and learned more about my great-great grandfather Smith’s land holdings.

When we arrived at the South Central Kentucky Cultural Center, I gave Nancy another call and we were in luck, she was home.

Nancy Had a Gift for Mother…

She hurried over to the Center to meet us, (and a nicer new cousin I can’t imagine meeting). She brought along a treasure, a photograph of my mother’s grandparents (complete with the names) that had been mailed back to the family from Kansas and presented it to my mom.

29 - Nancy Bertram Bush, standing and Dorothy Jones Stocking Barry seated.

29 - Nancy Bertram Bush, standing and Dorothy Jones Stocking Barry seated.

Mom had never seen photographs of her grandparents and when we brought the photograph home, we were able to identify Willis and his wife Martha in two other photographs that we had.

Nancy offered to take us around Barren County with her husband to try to locate the former home of Willis and Martha Ellen. We went up hill and down dale, we stopped at one family farmstead that had Smith family buried there, and we tramped through tall grass to record names and take photographs, but this was not our destination.

Our next stop proved to be the home of Charles and Virginia Hawley Smith, and we were able to visit with the family and see the land and outbuildings, some of which might have actually been standing during Charles & Virginia’s time.

The Family Cemetery Had Been Returned to Farmland…

Thanks to researching cemetery books we already knew that their family cemetery had been returned to farm land, which was disappointing.

66 - L - R: Nancy Bertram Bush, Norman and Sherry Stocking Kline, Dennis Bush pay respects to family members at the Temple Hill Baptist Church, Barren County, Kentucky

66 - L - R: Nancy Bertram Bush, Norman and Sherry Stocking Kline, Dennis Bush pay respects to family members at the Caney Fork Baptist Church, Temple Hill, Barren County, Kentucky

Next we stopped at the Caney Fork Baptist Church and cemetery and walked through the cemetery and paid our respects to cousins, great-aunts and great-uncles.

When we watched my mother get out of the car and in her words “stand on the land her father had played on as a child” and look around and see “where he came from,” it was a meaningful moment for us all.

We were grateful we were able to help her do this.

Dorothy Barry standing by car next to the Temple Hill Baptis Church & Cemetery - Barren County, Kentucky

Dorothy Barry standing by car next to the Caney Fork Baptist Church & Cemetery - Temple Hill, Barren County, Kentucky

Thank You, Cousin, Nancy…

It was with deep sadness that we received word about two years ago that our new-found cousin, Nancy Bertram Bush, had suffered a heart attack and passed away.

Thank you for a wonderful Genealogical Moment in Time, cousin Nancy.

And This Brother Came to Kansas – Tombstone Tuesday – James and Elizabeth (Conver) Kline

by Sherry Stocking Kline
Written for FamilyTreeWriter.com  -  October 5th, 2009

Though family and family history has always been important to me, I have my father-in-law to thank, at least in part, for my interest in researching genealogy.

My Father-in-Law Got Me Started…

It was my father-in-law who put the bug in my ear that “he sure would like to know more about his family” though he also let me know at the same time that he was afraid to find out.

Like many families, there was a ‘story’ involved. Three brothers, or some such number, and one went this way, one went another, they had an argument, and they never spoke again.

The Brothers Argued and Never Spoke Again?

The story that Pop, my father-in-law had heard was that the brothers came west, and then they argued on the way, and one came to Kansas and they never spoke again. And Pop was afraid that I might find something about his grandfather that would be, well, really embarrassing, so though he really wanted to know, he was more than a little hesitant.

He probably knew that the mystery would be a challenge that I couldn’t resist, and he was right.

I Was Clueless When I Began to Research…

I began to research. And it’s funny now how clueless I was when I started. My first trip to the library I was simply opening up Pennsylvania genealogy books looking for the Kline name, hoping to get lucky!

Kline isn’t all that common here, so I had no idea that Kline (meaning ‘little man’)  is pretty much the German version of Smith in Pennsylvania.

Bless her heart, Marsha Stenholm (now retired) of the Wichita Public Library took me under her wing, and we actually found a little info that first trip, and oh, my gosh, I was hooked!

James Ran in the Cherokee Strip Land Rush Race…

Here is the tombstone for Pop’s grandfather and grandmother.  They came from the Venango County area in Pennsylvania, and made a stop in Illinois and also in Iowa, leaving farms there to come to Caldwell, Sumner County, Kansas to make a run in the Cherokee Strip Land Rush Run into Oklahoma.  When they did not win any land in that race, they settled near Milan, Sumner County, Kansas.

James and Elizabeth Conver Kline are buried in the Ryan Township/Milan Cemetery in Sumner County, Township Cemetery, Milan, Sumner County, Kansas.

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James & Elizabeth (Conver) Kline - buried Ryan Township, Milan, Sumner County, Kansas

And though I did find that the siblings may have had some disagreements, it seems as though several kept in touch with one another, even after they all re-located to their new homes in the west.

Still a Work in Progress…

Even though Pop is gone now, this is still a ‘work in progress’ and I’ve connected with other distant branches of the family, and they’ve added much to the family tree information.

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