Posts Tagged ‘Kansas’

Wordless Wednesday – Maggie Corson McGinnis Celebrates her 100th Birthday

Maggie Corson McGinnis Celebrates her 100th Birthday

Maggie Corson McGinnis and her four children, left front, Maud, and back, Charles, Eugene, and Virgil McGinnis

Maggie Corson McGinnis, seated front right, celebrates her 100th Birthday with her four children, Maud, seated left front,and back left to right,, Charles, Eugene, and Virgil McGinnis.

RELATED LINKS:

Maggie Corson McGinnis Celebrates her 100th Birthday!

Margaret “Maggie” (Corson) McGinnis Sang for Abraham Lincoln

Gr-Grandmother Maggie (Corson) McGinnis & Maud McGinnis Stocking Scrapbook page

Thomas J. McGinnis Obituary

The Corson Family Association

Book: “Three Hundred Years with the Corson Family” by Orville Corson

Margaret “Maggie” (Corson) McGinnis Dies at Age 101

Amanuensis Monday – Elmer Leverett Stocking – Death Certificate Transcription

Elmer Leverett Stocking – Death Certificate Transcription

State of Kansas
State Board of Health – Division of Vital Statistics
Standard Certificate of Death – No. 96  5415

  1.  Place of Death:  Sumner   –   city
    Township                                                            Registered No.  10
    or City   Mayfield
  2. Full Name:    Elmer L. Stocking
    (a) Residence. No.  Mayfield, KS
    Length of residence in city or town where death occurred   58  yrs

PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS

  1. Sex:   Male
  2. Color or Race:  White
  3. Single, Married, Widowed or Divorced:   Married

5a. Spouse:  Maud Stocking

  1.  Date of Birth: Nov. 29, 1879
  2. Age:  58 years  1 month  24 Days
  3. Trade, Profession or particular kind of work done:  Farmer
  4. Industry or business in which work was done:  And Stockman
  5. Date deceased last worked at this occupation:  Not filled in
  6. Total time (years) spent   inn this occupation:  Not filled in
  7. Birthplace:  Mayfield, KS
  8. Father’s Name:   Roderick R. Stocking
  9. Father’s Birthplace:  Michigan
  10. Mother’s Maiden Name: Francis Hitchcock
  11. Mother’s Birthplace:  Crescent City, Illinois
  12. Informant:   Maud Stocking     Address:   Mayfield, KS
  13. Burial:    Mayfield, KS         Burial Date:  January 25, 1938
  14. Undertaker:  A. J. Frank, Wellington, KS
  15. Filed:    January 24, 1938      Registrar: Bernice S. Lindberg

MEDICAL CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

  1. Date of Death:   January 22, 1938
  2. I attended deceased from April 21, 1937 to January 22, 1938. I last saw him alive on January 15th, 1938.  Death is said to have occurred on the date stated above at 11:30 a.m.

The principal cause of death and related causes of importance in order of onset were as follows:

Cancer of Rt Adrenal gland    Date of onset:    1935

Artherosclerosis

 

  1. No Accident or injury
  2. Was disease or injury in any way related to occupation of the deceased:    No

Signed:  A. L. Ashmore  M. D.     Address:  601 Orpheum (?)

Day Five – 365 Days of Memories – Bartlett Arboretum and Best Friends Forever

Bartlett Arboretum and Best Friends Forever

Belle Plaine, Kansas, Bartlett Arboretum

Best Friends Forever Visit the Bartlett Arboretum in Belle Plaine Kansas

Sometimes, when you take a memory out and look at it again, and again, it gets better and better.  This time we four girls had together again after not being together for nearly twenty years, was just such a memory.

The day before we met up at our 50th Wellington High School Class of 66 Reunion. We shared hugs, and memories, photos of our kids and grandkids and got caught up.

We made plans the next day to meet and take in the beautiful Bartlett Arboretum and enjoy the lovely together before BFF Nancy and her hubby headed back home.

The day was one of those lovely Kansas Indian summer days in October that make you glad to live in Kansas. The sunlight was golden, the grasses still green and the leaves just beginning to turn gold.

It was a beautiful day, and a beautiful memory.

 

Amanuensis Monday – R. Stocking Injured in Farm Accident

Wellington Daily News
8 July 1921
Pg 1

R. STOCKING INJURED

I love doing newspaper research, especially when I find ‘buried treasure’ about my Great-Grandfather, Roderick Remine Stocking!

Roderick Stocking - Wellington Daily News

Roderick Stocking – Wellington Daily News

R. STOCKING INJURED (transcription)

Wellington Daily News
8 July 1921
Pg 1

Roderick Stocking of Mayfield, father of Ralph Stocking of this city, is suffering from an accident which might havev proved very serious. He and his son Porter are threshing at the Fred Stayton farm near Mayfield and their machine is run by an electric motor. In some unaccountable manner Mr. Stocking took hold of a bunch of live wires with a current of 13,200 Volts. Ralph says that the situation is similar to that described by one of the Chautauqua lecturers last summer when he said that a great deal of electricity has just the same effect as a small amount; that is the person will be stunned but not seriously injured. Mr. Stocking was put to bed, and while he is still unable to be up today, it is thought that he will suffer no serious result. A peculiar circumstance of the affair is that a tack in one of his shoes burnt a hole in his heel.

Live in Kansas?  Have a Kansas Driver’s License?

If so, you can research (most) Kansas newspapers for FREE!!!

Thanks to the Kansas State Historical Society, Kansan’s can access most of the Kansas newspapers offered on Newspapers.com just by going to the Kansas State Historical Society website, click on “Research”,, then click on “Digital Newspapers” in the dropdown box. Then scroll down on the page till you see a box like the one here that says: “Verify Your Driver’s License.”

Verification form for Digital Newspaper Access

Verification Form for Digital Newspaper Access.

I am so glad that my Great-Grandfather was not killed in this incident.  He lived to be almost 98 years old, and I remember seeing him 3 different times, even though I was 2 1/2 when he passed away.  He was a tall, handsome gentleman and I guess what I remember most is how tall he was and how white his hair was!

 

Amanuensis Monday – R. Stocking Injured – Wellington Daily News

Wellington Daily News
8 July 1921
Pg 1

Roderick Remine Stocking injured

Roderick Remine Stocking injured.

R. STOCKING INJURED

Roderick Stocking of Mayfield, father of Ralph Stocking of this city, is suffering from an accident which might have proved very serious.  He and his son Porter are threshing at the Fred Stayton farm near Mayfield and their machine is run by an electric motor.

In some unaccountable manner Mr. Stocking took hold of a bunch of live wires with a current of 13,200 Volts.  Ralph says that the situation is similar to that described by one of the Chautauqua lecturers last summer when he said that a great deal of electricity has just the same effect as a small amount; that is the person will be stunned but not seriously injured.

Mr. Stocking was put to bed, and while he is still unable to be up today, it is thought that he will suffer no serious result.  A peculiar circumstance of the affair is that a tack in one of his shoes burnt a hole in his heel.

Treasure Chest Thursday – Roderick & Frances “Fanny” Stocking 40th Anniversary

Fortieth Anniversary – Mr. & Mrs. Roderick Stocking

Wellington Daily News
4 May 1916; Page 2

A happy gathering was that at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Stocking last Wednesday when the fortieth wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Stocking of Mayfield, parents of Mr. Stocking was celebrated..

Mrs. and Mrs. Stocking were married at Crescent City, Illinois and came to Sumner County in 1878.  They are now living in the town of Mayfield.  For many years after taking residence in this county they lived on a farm near Mayfield and it was there that they raised their fine family.  As Mr. Stocking said he came to Sumner “when Wichita was the jumping off place.”

Those present at the celebration Wednesday were Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Stocking, Mr. and Mrs. Porter Stocking and son Wilmer, John Stocking, Mr. and Mrs. Wm Mitchell, Miss Nell Mitchell, Miss Julia Holland, Mrs. Lizzie Marshall and Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Stocking.

More Roderick & Frances Stocking Links:

Roderick Stocking with His Family

Roderick Porter and Myrtle Nyberg Wedding Photograph

Roderick Remine Stocking Photograph

Roderick Remine & Frances (Hitchcock) Stocking’s tombstone

Scrapbooking My Family History – Roderick & Frances “Fanny” Stocking Family

How Many Descendants Do Roderick & Frances “Fanny” Stocking Have?

 

 

Amanuensis Monday – Pauline Wimp’s Diploma – Kiowa County, Colorado

Quite some time ago, I picked up a box of photographs and other memorabilia at a yard sale, and I started posting a few of the photos and clippings here, hoping to connect with a family member, which did happen, but I never meant to let so much time go by before following up.  I am hoping to connect with that person again, and send her everything that I can.

Until then, here is a scan of Pauline Wimp’s April 1936 diploma in Kiowa County, Colorado.

Wimp, Pauline - 1936 Elementary Graduation booklet Front

Wimp, Pauline - 1936 Elementary Graduation booklet inside

Colorado Public Schools

Diploma – Colorado – Kiowa County

Be it known, that Pauline Wimp

of School District No. 6 in the County of Kiowa has completed the

course of elementary study prescribed for he Public Schools of Colorado.

In Testimony Whereof, this Diploma is given under our hands this

21st day of April A. D. 1936

Alma Vrooman, County Superintendent

Lois Sibey – Teacher **

Here are more links sharing some of the Wimp family information that was included in my garage sale finds:

Death of Sergeant Robert Wimp
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/06/amanuensis-monday-death-of-sgt-robert-wimp/

Sergeant Robert Wimp information
www.familytreewriter.com/2010/12/amanuensis-monday-sgt-robert-wimp/

Ford-Newland Wedding Announcement
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/mystery-monday-ford-newland-wedding-announcement/

** The name here may be Lois Sibcy.

Amanuensis Monday – Margaret Ethel “Peggy” Stocking Glaze’s Obituary

I re-did my membership with the Rutherford B Hayes library, www.rbhayes.org, recently, as I had found some interesting ‘stuff’ on their website, and I really like having access to the www.newspaperarchive.com site and also Heritage Quest, and that is included with the membership I have at that level.

Today, I was searching NewspaperArchive.com website for my uncle, Frank Stocking, and found a copy of my Aunt Peggy’s from the Hutchinson News digitized on the NewspaperArchive.com website.  And it never would have occurred to me to look at the Hutchinson News microfilms!!  Eureka!  I wasn’t doing genealogy when my lovely Aunt Peggy passed away, and so I had not saved it!

It was such a shock when Aunt Peggy died.  We knew she had a heart condition, but still, it was a shock.  My daughter had been born three weeks before, and we were all looking forward to visiting with Peggy’s brother and his wife when they came to visit in a few weeks, but that wasn’t to be.

I was still off work on maternity leave when we traveled to the funeral, and I took my 2 1/2 year old son and three-week-old daughter with Mom and I to her service.

Aunt Peggy was a ‘hoot.’  She also had a beautiful smile, a heart of gold, and an infectious laugh!  She was always cracking jokes, and I miss her.

Margaret Ethel "Peggy" Stocking Glaze

 

Margaret E. (Peggy) Glaze Obituary
Hutchinson News
July 28, 1977
Column 1; Page 6

MEADE – Margaret E. (Peggy) Glaze, 62, died Tuesday at Meade Hospital.  Born Margaret E. Stocking, May 23, 1915 at Mayfield, she was a retired postal employee and lived here since 1945.

She was a member of United Methodist Church, Rebekah Lodge, OES, all of Meade.

Survivors include brothers: Carl L. Stocking, San Jose, California, Frank A. Stocking, Castro Valley, California, Herbert L. Stocking, Downeyville, California; sisters: Mrs. Frances Hill, Arkansas City, Mrs. Mary E. Metcalf, Colorado Springs.

Funeral will be 10 a.m. Saturday at the church; Reverend Dale Ellenberg.  Graveside services will be 3:30 p.m. Saturday in Mayfield Cemetery.  Friends may call 11 a.m.  Thursday until 9 a.m. Saturday at Fidler-Orme Mortuary, Meade.

Here is Peggy’s Find a Grave Memorial.

 

 

Amanuensis Monday – John Hurlburt Stocking’s Death

Norwalk Daily Register
Norwalk, Ohio
20 Oct 1894
Pg 4 Col 6

After visiting friends and relatives a couple of weeks in Clarksfield and New London, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stocking left on last Wednesday for their home in El Dorado, Kansas, via St. Charles, Illinois, where they halted to spend a few days with relatives, whence they would start direct for their home; but on Sunday evening, on retiring for the night, Mr. Stocking fell down a flight of stairs, rupturing a blood vessel, the blood flowing from his nose and ears; no bones broken, he never spoke, but lived one hour, when his spirit took its flight across the dark river to that “undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns.”  Mr. Stocking was one of nature’s nobility, a true and good man.  To Mrs. Stocking and their son, in their bereavement, we extend our sympathies.

John Hurlburt Stocking’s son, Roderick Remine Stocking, was my great-grandfather, and you can find a photograph of him here, as well as more information about him.

Roderick’s mother, Betsey Jane Ames, died in Oct 1856 shortly after Roderick’s little brother Bishop was born.  After Betsey’s death, John Hurlburt married Caroline Gates in April 1860.

In 1894, my great-grandfather, Roderick was living on the farm that he homesteaded in Sumner County, Kansas with his wife, Frances “Fannie” Hitchcock.

More Links:

Roderick Remine Stocking Photograph 
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2011/05/wordless-wednesday-roderick-remine-stocking-photo/

The J. H. Stocking Bible
Carnival of Genealogy – the J. H. Stocking Bible

 

Carnival of Genealogy – Carrie Breneman Jones

I love this photograph of my Grandma and Grandpa Jones.  Although this was taken before I was born (as my grandfather was in it) this is how I remember my grandmother looking.  Round-faced and smiling, and just a bit plump. Comfortable to snuggle up against. (Grandma’s are supposed to be plump, right?  I hope so, because I’m working on being a good Gramma.)

I wish that my grandfather had lived long enough for me to meet (and remember him), but this Carnival of Genealogy post is about my Grandma Carrie Breneman Jones, who died when I was eight years old.

Warner & Carrie Breneman Jones

Warner LaRue and Carrie Esther (Breneman) Jones

 

When I was just a little bitty girl, my mama told me that her mama was really unhappy that they had named me “Sherry”.  She said that Sherry is also the name of an alcoholic beverage, and her mama just wasn’t happy with her for giving me that name.

So I guess it’s no wonder when I went to grade school and I really didn’t know what my Grandma’s last name was, that when the teacher began talking about Kansas’ Carrie Nation going into bars with an axe to fight for temperance I kind of wondered for a short time if that was my Grandma Carrie that did that.  I don’t know why I didn’t run home and ask my mom about it, but I didn’t, but I did figure out, after awhile, that my Grandma Carrie wasn’t the infamous axe wielding Carrie in my history book.  (The above doesn’t look like the picture of an axe-wielding Grandma, does it?)

My Grandma Carrie was a very crafty lady.  Her hands were always busy making something.  She loved to crochet, from the very tiny delicate flower shaped earrings to the beautiful heirloom bedspread that she made for my mother, and that my mother later gave to me.

She crocheted doll clothes for my dolls and when my new favorite plastic horse needed a rider and there were none to be bought in the correct size, she created one.  My Grandma Carrie created an Indian, excuse me, a Native American brave complete with tiny leather fringed breeches and shirt, and bendable legs so he could sit a horse.  I still have him, tucked away (somewhere) and when I find him, I’ll try to add the picture here.

And as I write this, I just realized that she may have fashioned the brave after the Native Americans that came to their cabin in Nebraska asking for food when she was just a very small girl, and they lived on the Nebraska prairie where my Grandma herded cattle on horseback by herself on the prairie during the day.

When she was older, Grandma Carrie taught herself to paint and she loved the National Geographic magazine for its beautiful photographs that often inspired her painting.  She also painted a picture of my brother’s 4-H Dairy Cow “Jenny,” too, for him, and “Jenny” hung on our kitchen wall while I was growing up.

I wish my Grandma had lived long enough for me to get to know her as an adult, because I think I inherited many of my interests and talents from her.  Like my Grandma, I’m crafty, though I’ve not had much time to do it lately, and if I can see something, particularly a fabric something, I can often make a pattern for it or create it from one I find.  Also like my Grandma and my mom, I painted for several years till I learned I was sensitive to the oil and turpentine smells, and like my Grandma and my mother I love a good book!

And, I wish she had lived long enough to ask her all those many genealogy questions that I now wish I had the answers to!

 

Other Links:

 Wordless Wednesday: Stocking & Jones Family
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/10/wordless-wednesday-stocking-jones-family/

Wordless Wednesday: Constantine Breneman & Carrie Breneman Jones & family
http://www.familytreewriter.com/2010/04/wordless-wednesday-constantine-breneman-carrie-breneman-jones-families/

 

Kreativ Blogger Award
Genealogy Book Shelf



Categories
GeneaBloggers
Link to the Geneabloggers Website
Genealogy Friends
Blog Catalog
Genealogy Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
Wordpress Services
GeneaBloggers

April 2018
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30