Amanuensis Monday – R. Stocking Injured in Farm Accident

Wellington Daily News
8 July 1921
Pg 1

R. STOCKING INJURED

I love doing newspaper research, especially when I find ‘buried treasure’ about my Great-Grandfather, Roderick Remine Stocking!

Roderick Stocking - Wellington Daily News

Roderick Stocking – Wellington Daily News

R. STOCKING INJURED (transcription)

Wellington Daily News
8 July 1921
Pg 1

Roderick Stocking of Mayfield, father of Ralph Stocking of this city, is suffering from an accident which might havev proved very serious. He and his son Porter are threshing at the Fred Stayton farm near Mayfield and their machine is run by an electric motor. In some unaccountable manner Mr. Stocking took hold of a bunch of live wires with a current of 13,200 Volts. Ralph says that the situation is similar to that described by one of the Chautauqua lecturers last summer when he said that a great deal of electricity has just the same effect as a small amount; that is the person will be stunned but not seriously injured. Mr. Stocking was put to bed, and while he is still unable to be up today, it is thought that he will suffer no serious result. A peculiar circumstance of the affair is that a tack in one of his shoes burnt a hole in his heel.

Live in Kansas?  Have a Kansas Driver’s License?

If so, you can research (most) Kansas newspapers for FREE!!!

Thanks to the Kansas State Historical Society, Kansan’s can access most of the Kansas newspapers offered on Newspapers.com just by going to the Kansas State Historical Society website, click on “Research”,, then click on “Digital Newspapers” in the dropdown box. Then scroll down on the page till you see a box like the one here that says: “Verify Your Driver’s License.”

Verification form for Digital Newspaper Access

Verification Form for Digital Newspaper Access.

I am so glad that my Great-Grandfather was not killed in this incident.  He lived to be almost 98 years old, and I remember seeing him 3 different times, even though I was 2 1/2 when he passed away.  He was a tall, handsome gentleman and I guess what I remember most is how tall he was and how white his hair was!

 

Newspaper Research! Dr. Joseph T. Breneman Buys A New Car!

I love researching in old newspapers!

Just like Forrest Gump said in the movie, “You never know what you might find!”

You can get a glimpse into your ancestor’s lives, learn who their friends were, what they did on vacation, and sometimes, when the local doctor buys a new car, it makes the news!!

Dr. Joseph T. Breneman, of the Breneman Hospital, Purchases a New Car

Dr. Joseph T. Breneman, of the Breneman Hospital, Purchases a New Car.  Oakland Tribune, 12 June 1907; page 45.

Dr. Joseph T. Breneman lived and practiced in Wellington, Kansas.  His parents, Christian and Mary Breneman, lived in Wellington near him.

His brother, Constantine, a Civil War veteran, lived in the Mayfield and Milan area, and worked with his son, Otto, as a blacksmith in Mayfield.

 

Check out other Breneman Links:

Fannie Breneman, Wife of Dr. Joseph T. Breneman’s Obituary

The Mayfield Blacksmith Shop

 

Amanuensis Monday – David Hurlbut

David Hurlbut

David Hurlbut (Ref #20) (his father – John, his grandfather – Thomas (Ref # 1)) was born in Middletown, Ct, 11 August 1688.

He was a Blacksmith…

He also was a blacksmith, having learned the trade of his father, and the first one, it is said, of that occupation at Upper Houses (now town of Cromwell) where he first settled.

There was laid out to him in the North Society, 15 March, 1712, four acres of land. In 1727, with Samuel Tracy, he rented a grist-mill for eight years. In 1730 he sells Daniel Hurlbut in South Lots, Middletown.  In 1734 he sold his house and lands in Upper Houses, for L 210, and moved to Chatham, Middle Haddam Soc’y.  He owned considerable land in the Long Lots near the above named village, portions of which he deeded to his children as they married and settled.

He m. (1) 22 Sept. 1709, Mary Savage, (b. 11 Feb 1691) dau. of John, Jr. and Mary Savage of Upper Houses.

David and wife Mary – Members of the Second Middletown Church…

The names of David Hurlbut and Mary his wife, appears second on the first list of church members on the formation of the “2d church in Middletown,” (Upper Houses) 1715. April 28, 1740, Mrs. Mary Hurlbut, wife of David, was recommended to the church in Middle Haddam.

In 1744, he removed to Groton opposite New London, Ct., and purchased property there in 1746; he returned however to Middle Haddam after 1760.

The date of the death of his wife Mary is not learned, but he m. (2) in Middle Haddam, Mercy ____________. He died 29 Oct 1773, on the farm, as I am told, which he deeded in 1761 to his son Gideon, and where (in 1861) resides Jesse Hurlbut, son of Gideon, in what is now Portland, Ct. His will was proven 26 Nov 1773.

Their Children…

(1st m.)
83. Mary, b. in Middletown, Upper Houses, 15 Dec 1709. + App.
84. Mercy, b. in Middletown, 22 Feb. 1713, d. aged about 15 years
85. Abigail, b. in Middletown, 2 June, 1714. + App.
86. David Jr. b. in Middletown, 1 Nov. 1716. +
(p.28)
87. William, b. in Middletown, 28 Nov. 1718. +
88. Honor, b. in Middletown, 25 April 1721. + App
89. Gideon, b. in Middletown, 11 Jan. 1723. d. 16 Jan. 1724
90. Stephen, b. in Middletown, prob 1725. +
91. Thankful, b. in Middletown, 26 April 1727. + App
92. Gideon (2d) b. in Middletown, 9 June 1729. +
93. Mercy (2d) b. in Middletown, 1 April 1731. (m. John Arnold of Haddam, Ct.)

David’s grandfather – Thomas Hurlbut

“The Hurlbut Genealogy: Record of the Descendants of Thomas Hurlbut
by Henry H. Hurlbut, Joel, Munsell’s Sons, Publishers, 1888, p. 27 & p. 28

Amanuensis Monday – Roderick Remine Stocking in the 1883 Historical Atlas of Sumner County, Kansas

When you’re hunting for information about your family, and especially if you are trying to find glimpses into their lives and create a word picture for your family, you want to look every place you can think of, so checking old atlases can add more information to your family tree.

The 1883 Historical Atlas of Sumner County, Kansas shared information about my Great-grandfather, Roderick Remine Stocking.

Some of it was information that I might not have found otherwise.

According to this Atlas (and not all have this information), my great-grandparents came from Michigan, and settled on their farm in 1878 where they farmed and raised livestock.

They lived near Mayfield, Kansas, in the NE 1/4 Section 13-32-3W.  From other sources, I know that they homesteaded that quarter section and raised their family there.

Their son, Roderick Porter, raised their family there until he was killed in a farm accident, and then the family moved to the small town of Mayfield.

See excerpts from the atlas below:

Historical Atlas of Sumner County, Kansas,
Compiled – Drawn – Published from Personal Examinations and Surveys;
John P Edwards,
No 31 South 6th Street, Philadelphia, and Quincy, Illinois, 1883,
Engraved by A. H. Mueller, 530 Locust St., Philadelphia, PA, Printed by F. Bourquin,
31 S. 6th St.,
Philadelphia, PA

List of Patrons – p. 14
Name: Stocking, R. R.
Post Office: Mayfield, KS
Section: 13-32-3W
Business: Farmer and Stock Raiser
Nativity: Michigan
Settlement in County: 1878

p. 67
R. R. Stocking
Township 32 South Range 3 West
NE 1/4 13-32-3W
R. R.Stocking

Oh, and don’t forget to add this information into your family tree program (if you use one) and be sure and cite your sources so you know where you found it!

Elizabeth Shown Mills has written the definitive source for citing your resources, and the following links to her book and “Cheat Sheet” can help you cite your sources correctly :

“Evidence Explained: History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace 3rd Edition Revised”  by Elizabeth Shown Mills

“QuickSheet: Citing Ancestry Databases & Images Evidence Style 2nd Edition” by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Disclosure: Some of the links included in this blog post may be affiliate links. This means that I receive a small commission for recommending this product.

This does not increase the price that you pay, and it helps support this genealogy blog.

I do not promote products that I do not use or do not believe in. However, it is always best to do your own research on products to make certain that they are a good fit for you and your family.

 

Amanuensis Monday – R. Stocking Injured – Wellington Daily News

Wellington Daily News
8 July 1921
Pg 1

Roderick Remine Stocking injured

Roderick Remine Stocking injured.

R. STOCKING INJURED

Roderick Stocking of Mayfield, father of Ralph Stocking of this city, is suffering from an accident which might have proved very serious.  He and his son Porter are threshing at the Fred Stayton farm near Mayfield and their machine is run by an electric motor.

In some unaccountable manner Mr. Stocking took hold of a bunch of live wires with a current of 13,200 Volts.  Ralph says that the situation is similar to that described by one of the Chautauqua lecturers last summer when he said that a great deal of electricity has just the same effect as a small amount; that is the person will be stunned but not seriously injured.

Mr. Stocking was put to bed, and while he is still unable to be up today, it is thought that he will suffer no serious result.  A peculiar circumstance of the affair is that a tack in one of his shoes burnt a hole in his heel.

Amanuensis Monday – Mrs. Fannie I Breneman Obituary, wife of Dr. Joseph T. Breneman

 

Mrs.Fannie I. Breneman Obituary
Oakland Tribune
22 April 1947

 

Breneman, Fannie obit - widow of Dr. Joseph T. Breneman - 7e7e4fb5cda14a5283ce3ce807401b92_crop

Fannie Breneman Obituary Transcription

Funeral Rites for Physician’s Widow

El Cerrito, April 22 – Funeral rtes are scheduled at 1:30 today for Mrs. Fannie I. Breneman, 84, widow of Dr. Joseph T. Breneman, pioneer Contra Costa County physician. She died Saturday following an extended illness.

A native of Illyria, Iowa, she had resided in Califonia for 57 years, and in this community for the past 35.

Surviving are four daughters, Miss Fay Breneman, Miss Hazel Breneman, and Mrs. Eula Staley, all of El Cerrito, and Mrs. Frances West of Craddockville, Virginia, two sons, George H. of Martinez and Flint Breneman of Los Angeles.

Services will be conducted at Wilson and Kratzer Chapel. Inurnment at Sunset View Crematory will follow.

I love it when I can add another piece to the family genealogy puzzle, and finding this obituary was the work of a snowy winter day when I had a flu bug, so finding an obituary that had been evading me made the day a lot better.

Now, if I could just find her husband’s obituary, that would be awesome!

 

Amanuensis Monday – Stocking & Hitchcock Family Reunion

This winter was one for the records books for nasty little flu ‘bugs’ going around!  But whenever I found myself  down and out, I logged onto the digital newspaper site at KSHS.org and began typing in family surnames as keywords!

Below is just one of the many fun little family tidbits that I found:

Wellington Daily News report on the Stocking - Hitchcock Family Reunion held on 21 May 1913 in Wellington.

Stocking – Hitchcock Family Reunion

Wellington Daily News
21 May 1913
Pg 1, Col. 2

Family Reunion

The home of Ralph Stocking, 612 North F, is the scene of a happy party being a family reunion.  The guests are Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Stocking, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Stocking and children, Mr. and Mrs. Porter Stocking and son, John Stocking all of Mayfield, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hitchcock, of Chicago.

Merry Christmas! “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” with Jase and Missy

I hope you all have a Very Merry Christmas!

Thanks to Footnote Maven of  http://www.footnotemaven.com/, Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/footnoteMaven?fref=photo for her Christmas Carol blogging challenge!  I have many, many favorite Christmas carols, and listening to all of them is a favorite part of Christmas for me.  Most all of the time, I love the old favorites by the original artists, but I add new favorites as they come along.

Two years ago, I added “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” by Kansas girl Martina McBride and Dean Martin to a favorite’s list on my iPod!  (And just so you know, my hubby got to meet her when she was still singing with her parents in different gigs around Kansas!)

He had truck trouble, and Martina’s folks were on their way to a gig and they picked him up and took him into town!  She was a beautiful young lady (still is), and he came home with stars in his eyes!

Here are photos and their version of this Christmas classic

And last year, I added a new couple, Missy and Jase Robertson, singing “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” to my iPod’s favorites’ list.  Missy has a lovely voice, and together they do such a cute job of singing this Christmas favorite.

And as for WHY is it one of my Christmas favorites.  Here my “why.”

My Mom and Dad got up at five a.m. every morning, EVERY morning, cold, rain, snow, sleet,  ice, didn’t matter, to milk the dairy cows.  After they finished milking, Dad  went out in the pasture to feed the cows, and Mom came in the house to start breakfast. (And wake me up if I wasn’t already.)

I have this wonderful memory of my dad coming in from a cold, snowy, early winter morning after feeding the cattle, all bundled up in overalls and a heavy flannel-lined coat, his face red from the cold, and that twinkle in his eye that was always there when he looked at my Mom, and he would sing “Baby, it’s Cold Outside” as he snuggled up to her, nuzzled her neck and gave her a chilly hug and kiss.  And there was always laughter between them when he did that, and usually a few more kisses.

My dad died when I was not quite 13, and I am thankful for such a special memory, and the love that my parents had for each other and for me, and  that still brings a smile to my face.

And as I sit here, playing these two songs, my mom, age nearly 103, has a big smile on her face, and she is singing along!

Thank God for the memories!

Treasure Chest Thursday – Roderick & Frances “Fanny” Stocking 40th Anniversary

Fortieth Anniversary – Mr. & Mrs. Roderick Stocking

Wellington Daily News
4 May 1916; Page 2

A happy gathering was that at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Stocking last Wednesday when the fortieth wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Stocking of Mayfield, parents of Mr. Stocking was celebrated..

Mrs. and Mrs. Stocking were married at Crescent City, Illinois and came to Sumner County in 1878.  They are now living in the town of Mayfield.  For many years after taking residence in this county they lived on a farm near Mayfield and it was there that they raised their fine family.  As Mr. Stocking said he came to Sumner “when Wichita was the jumping off place.”

Those present at the celebration Wednesday were Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Stocking, Mr. and Mrs. Porter Stocking and son Wilmer, John Stocking, Mr. and Mrs. Wm Mitchell, Miss Nell Mitchell, Miss Julia Holland, Mrs. Lizzie Marshall and Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Stocking.

More Roderick & Frances Stocking Links:

Roderick Stocking with His Family

Roderick Porter and Myrtle Nyberg Wedding Photograph

Roderick Remine Stocking Photograph

Roderick Remine & Frances (Hitchcock) Stocking’s tombstone

Scrapbooking My Family History – Roderick & Frances “Fanny” Stocking Family

How Many Descendants Do Roderick & Frances “Fanny” Stocking Have?

 

 

Amanuensis Monday – Constantine Breneman – Union Soldier – G.A.R. Post #90

Grand Army of the Republic

John Goldy Post #90 – Milan, Kansas

Muster Roll of Members of this Post Mustered or Admitted by Transfer During the Six Months ending the ______ day of _____ __ [this was not filled in in the digitized copy]

W. T. Boatright

B. L. Beebe

H. L. Benedict

M. L. Emery        Age: 58      Born: New York  Entry into Service: Aug 1864 Rank: Res           Co: D         3 Col Cavalry      Date: Dec 1864

C Breneman       Age: 59      Born: Ohio        Entered into Service:  Aug 1862    Co.:    105 Ohio      Date: Aug 1865

D. W. Gilbert

J Housworth

G. W. Sease

J. Sharr

C. Marshall

S. S. McClure

A. V. Worthington

M. T. Weller

 

C. Breneman      Rank: ?      Co. H         Reg’t 105 Ohio

M. L. Emery        Rank: ?      Co. D         3′ Col Cavly

My great-grandfather, Constantine “Tom” Breneman, was a blacksmith during the Civil War, and he was also a blacksmith after he settled in Kansas after the Civil War.  It appears that he taught one of his sons, Otto Breneman, this skill also, as Otto had a blacksmith shop in the tiny town of Mayfield, Kansas, and Otto and Constantine worked there together for a time before Otto’s death at an early age.  Otto and Constantine are pictured Here.

Other Links:

Constantine Breneman, George and Katie Jones, Carrie Jones & families

Otto Breneman & Constantine Breneman blacksmith shop – Mayfield, Kansas

Constantine Breneman and His Buggy Horse Photograph of Ott’s father, Constantine driving a buggy with his beautiful buggy horse.

Constantine Breneman’s Buggy Horse – Photograph of Constantine’s Buggy Horse

My Poem to My Ancestors

 

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